west end conservatory

Dustin Laurenzi’s Natural Language at West End Conservatory

Dustin Laurenzi’s Natural Language RECORD RELEASE
w/ Devin Drobka‘s Bell Dance Songs

Friday, September 16th, 2016

West End Conservatory
5500 W Vliet St
Milwaukee, WI

$10 // all ages
7:30pm

SET 1: DEVIN DROBKA’S BELL DANCE SONGS

Devin Drobka – drums
Chris Weller – saxophone
Mike Bjella – saxophone
Clay Schaub – bass

“Bell Dance Songs brims with such melodic and rhythmic tensions, often evoking dance-like rhythms, as a bell’s ring might, resonating in circular fashion more than articulating step patterns or back beats. This creative activity is very characteristic of Motian, who always defied conventions of the rhythm-maker’s role.” – Kevin Lynch, No Depression

www.cargocollective.com/devindrobka
devindrobka.bandcamp.com

SET 2: DUSTIN LAURENZI’S NATURAL LANGUAGE

Dustin Laurenzi – saxophone
Jeff Swanson – guitar
Mike Harmon – bass
Nate Friedman – drums

Saxophonist Dustin Laurenzi has made himself known throughout Chicago as a collaborator in some of the city’s most exciting and forward-thinking projects. With “Natural Language”, Laurenzi takes an unexpected approach to his debut recording as a leader, opting for restraint and a quiet confidence that spans the album’s seven tracks.

“Natural Language” will be released on September 9, 2016 on ears&eyes Records.

“Laurenzi plays with a beguiling cool that belies the sophistication and flexibility of his lines” – Peter Margasak, Chicago Reader

“…superbly winning…like listening to a human voice.” – Robert Rodi, Newcity Music

dustinlaurenzi.bandcamp.com
dustinlaurenzi.com

Terrence McManus Solo at West End Conservatory

Thursday, July 7th 2016
8pm, $10

West End Conservatory
5500 W Vliet St
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53208
(414) 502-9378

Terrence McManus, guitar

A native of Brooklyn, New York, guitarist/composer/sound artist Terrence McManus has been called “… one of New York’s latest guitar heroes …” (All About Jazz), and that he has “… hit on an entirely new language.” (Gambit), and “… possesses the goods to impart a significant impact …” (jazzreview.com). Time Out New York calls him a “Texture-minded guitar abstractionist …” and the NY Times times has described him as a “guitarist drawn to abstract texture”.He has performed or recorded with many of the major innovators in contemporary music, including John Zorn, Bill Frisell, Tim Berne, Gerry Hemingway, Mark Dresser, Don Byron, Ellery Eskelin, Herb Robertson, Mark Helias, John Hollenbeck, Ben Monder, Russ Lossing, Randy Peterson, Mat Maneri, Tom Rainey, Michael Sarin, and Marty Ehrlich. He has performed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Carnegie Hall, the New York Guitar Festival, Jazz Festival Willisau (Switzerland), Jazzfestival Saalfelden (Austria), the New Orleans Jazz National Historic Park, and the inaugural month at John Zorn’s The Stone. Terrence was featured in the book State of the Axe: Guitar Masters in Photographs and Words, by legendary photographer Ralph Gibson.

The Bad Plus at West End Conservatory

Saturday, February 6th 2016

West End Conservatory
5500 W Vliet St
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53208
(414) 502-9378

Ethan Iverson, piano
Reid Anderson, bass
Dave King, drums

Q & A session at 530pm
shows at 7 and 9pm
$25 cover per set


The Bad Plus came together at the end of the 20th century and has avoided easy categorization ever since, winning critical hosannas and a legion of fans worldwide with their creativity, unique sound and flair for live performance. Based in New York City, the intensely collaborative trio has constantly searched for rules to break and boundaries to cross, bridging genres and techniques while exploring the infinite possibilities of three exceptional musicians working in perfect sync. The Bad Plus’ 10th studio recording, Inevitable Western, sees bassist Reid Anderson, pianist Ethan Iverson, and drummer David King further honing the same conceptual base that fired their inception. Yet again they continue to explore myriad musical forms born of jazz along with any sonic source that forwards music that is uniquely The Bad Plus. Inevitable Western is an album where pop, blues, and folk meld with classic melodies and rhythmic innovation into that rarest of hybrids: intelligent music for the masses.

Russ Johnson – Jon Irabagon Quintet feat. Ohad Talmor at West End Conservatory

Tuesday, December 29

at 8:45 PM

West End Conservatory
5500 W Vliet St
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53208
(414) 502-9378

Russ Johnson – trumpet
Jon Irabagon – saxophones
Ohad Talmor – tenor
Matt Ulery – bass
Jon Deitemyer – drums

$10 cover / 2 sets


Trumpeter Russ Johnson is a recent Midwest transplant after spending 23 years as an important member of New York City’s jazz community. He has six recordings as a leader or co-leader and has performed on more than 75 recordings as a sideman. Johnson has worked alongside many legendary figures in jazz including Lee Konitz, Steve Swallow, Bill Frisell, and Joe Lovano. In addition, he has performed and/or recorded with a long list of the prominent musicians currently on the international jazz scene including Ken Vandermark, Myra Melford, and Jenny Scheinman. His most recent recording, Meeting Point was released in May 2014 on Relay Recordings, and is already receiving critical acclaim. Johnson currently serves as the Director of Jazz Studies at the University of Wisconsin – Parkside.

 

John O’Gallagher Trio at West End Conservatory

John O’Gallagher Trio
Wednesday, Nov 18, 2015. 8:30pm
$10

John O’Gallagher – alto/compositions
Johannes Weidenmuller – bass
Mark Ferber – drums

John O’Gallagher is considered one of the most compelling alto saxophonists and composers at work today on the New York jazz scene. He is known for an innovative style which pushes the boundaries of jazz while rooted in it’s tradition.

“Mr. O’Gallagher is an exploratory alto saxophonist with a clear melodic streak” – The New York Times

Born in Anaheim Califorina in 1964 he began playing alto saxophone in grade school after his family moved to Spokane, Washington. Upon graduating high school he studied briefly at Eastern Washington University before moving to Boston to attend Berklee College of Music. There he studied with legendary saxophone gurus Joe Viola, Jerry Bergonzi and George Garzone.

During the past 25 years living in New York he has become known for his projects as a leader, and as a sought after sideman, working with artist such as Joe Henderson, Maria Schnieder, Kenny Wheeler, Billy Hart, Tony Malaby, Jeff Williams, Tom Rainey,  Chris Cheek, Ralph Alessi, Rudresh Manhathappa, Mike Formanek, Ben Monder and numerous others.

Tim Berne’s Decay at West End Conservatory

Live at The West End Conservatory
5500 W Vliet St, Milwaukee, WI 53208
Phone: (414) 502-9378
www.westendconservatory.com

Thursday, October 22, 2015. 8pm $20

Tim Berne’s Decay ft.
Michael Formanek – Bass
Ryan Ferreira – Guitar
Ches Smith – Drums

Milwaukee and Madison and Surrounding areas. Here is your chance to hear Saxophonist/Composer Tim Berne’s new quartet as they embark on a tour that will culminate with the making of a new record.

http://screwgunrecords.com/

Please join us for an intimate night with some of the world’s leading voices in Creative Music and Improvisation.

DOORS AT 730PM – SHOW AT 8PM

——-$20 for 2 sets ——–

More Information:
Beyond his recordings as a bandleader, Berne has recorded and/or performed with guitarist Bill Frisell, avant-garde composer/sax player John Zorn, violinist Mat Maneri, guitarist David Torn, cellist Hank Roberts, trumpet player Herb Robertson, the ARTE Quartett and as a member of the cooperative trio Miniature.

Recent years have found Berne performing in several different groups with drummers Tom Rainey and Gerald Cleaver, keyboardist Craig Taborn, bassists Michael Formanek and Drew Gress, guitarists Marc Ducret and David Torn, and reeds player Chris Speed.

He is one-third of the group BBC (Berne/Black/Cline) along with drummer Jim Black and Nels Cline of Wilco. The group released a critically acclaimed album called The Veil in 2011.

Berne’s complex, multi-section compositions are often quite lengthy; twenty to thirty minute pieces are not unusual. One critic wrote that Berne’s long songs “don’t grow tiresome. The musicians are brilliantly creative and experienced enough not to get lost in all the room provided by these large time frames.”